Starting in The World of Psychology? How the Business Has Changed?

If you are currently in the process of studying a degree in psychology, you might be wondering what jobs are out there for you – potentially outside the traditional role of a psychologist. This degree does come with a wide variety of employment options; for example, many use their degree to assist marketing strategies. After all, who is going to understand the psychology of a particular audience better than, well, a psychologist? With this in mind, here I how the industry is changing.

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Shutterstock Licensed Photo – By George Rudy

Applied psychology

It has been found that fewer and fewer people are entering traditional, academic roles following a degree in psychology. Instead, people are making use of applied psychology – using their education to benefit businesses and specific departments. In fact, many academics are having to adjust to the idea that their students are unlikely to follow in their footsteps.

A careful dialogue and new technology

As we begin to understand more about eating disorders, the more that we know a careful dialogue is warranted. Challenging unhelpful issues surrounding food and anorexic meals should be paired with awareness about triggering words and subjects. This condition is known for having a high mortality rate, and yet there is not enough public discussion or awareness about dialogue – which is something psychologists have to uphold.

However, it’s not all bad news. The technology surrounding this condition is improving, and it is seeing some striking developments in how to change eating behavior. Companies such as C2Care are using the virtual reality of healthy eating to help conditions such as anorexia, Dysmorphophobia, and bulimia. A VR Diet is perhaps not something that would have been in the public discourse 10 years ago, but it is already making its mark.

Collaboration

It has been agreed by psychologists and psychiatrists that there needs to be more of a focus on collaboration. This means that if you are considering making a move to the world of psychology, you will likely see more of an emphasis on communication with other practitioners. Not only is this great for patients who could be moved to a psychologist that is right for them, but also for practitioners who need referrals.

Increasingly progressive

As we progress through the years, psychology’s approach to eating disorders, mental illnesses, and what was previously termed as a mental illness has adapted with the times. Those who are struggling with anorexic tendencies will notice the language is changing, and those who are part of the LGBT+ and BAME communities will notice that practitioners are far more inclusive and respectful. Two instances from this history of psychology timeline will show just how far we’ve come in terms of inclusivity:

  • 1840: psychology becomes a science that is deemed separate to psychiatry.
  • 1907: a major paper is published on dementia.
  • It was only in 2013 that ‘gender dysphoria’ replaced the term ‘gender identity disorder’ according to the APA – a surprisingly late but necessary advancement.

Psychology and its progress through the decades has certainly not been a straightforward improvement. While some conditions have been heavily investigated, others have fallen to the side. However, modern technology has helped us to gain a much more developed understanding of how it can be used today.